And on the Second Day

The day after making a commitment to change is probably one of the hardest days. EVER. Suddenly all my good ideas seem taxing, like chores. I realized this was probably it involved a lot of self-reflection and self-criticism, which no one likes to dwell on.

Yet, I find my motivation in online video clips and the mandatory day-to-day grind of a Wednesday morning.

In order to make sure everything got done, I made a list. I adore to-do lists, as they help me visualize the tasks of the day and the secret giddiness I feel crossing them out.

Doing this is victorious, as if to say “Ha ha! I win! I cross you out of existence! I am the champion! *thunderous applause*”

*yeah...*
*yeah…*

Wednesdays are tough.


 

  1. Say what I mean and mean what I say. (Even in response to “Hi, how are you today?”)
  2. Do what I love to be who I am. (Run and practice cello daily)
  3. Be an honest Christian person. (Strive to rise above gossip and genuinely put others before myself.)

 

Although my day did not chronologically follow the homework assignment, for sake of argument, I will evaluate my day according to the tasks I set before myself.

1. Say what I mean.

This task was fairly straightforward but it involved more restraint than it did freedom to create “a better me”. I can’t count how many times I responded with “I’m good, how about you?”, but I can’t say it wasn’t an entirely false statement. My day did go pretty well. I am in fairly good health. My family is not currently under duress. The only major stressor is homework.

The homework though…ah, yes, homework. It is piling up faster than I can accomplish it. I will have to get right back to it after posting this.

CalvinHomework

I did, however, find myself editing my comments before I made them.  Once it saved me from speaking, what I realized later, would have been a politically incorrect. This is not necessarily a negative thing, as carefully choosing words before you speak them is in itself a kind of nameless virtue. Later, I found myself staying better on task by not saying random stories or irrelevant comments. I plan to make further notice of this.

2.  Do what I love to be who I am. (Run and practice cello daily)

↑ I began today with a morning run. After creating the diary, I resolved that I should do this every morning. I found a trail around campus that suited me perfectly.

So, I mustered my groggy morning mind and hit the trail. I ended up actually running two miles, as I took a side-path to the trail by a happy accident.

Χ I did not end up practicing cello today, even though I really wished I could. Homework overran my free time and I had to let cello slide once more. I am a college student first.

cello-and-man

I leafed through my sheet music and chord theory to make up for lost practice time.

3. Be an honest Christian person. (Strive to rise above gossip and genuinely put others before myself.)

While I wasn’t able to attend our special music and praise event tonight, Χ I believe I accomplished this task in my social realm.

↑ My roommate brought home some juicy gossip from her boyfriend’s school regarding “activities” in the resident hall bathrooms. She was promptly inclined to discuss it with her friends via video chat. I was promptly inclined to put headphones on.

In conversation, in the spirit of the first comment, I made sure to be mindful during discussions and talk about their lives and their concerns before my own, if at all. This really opened a gateway for discussion with a classmate of mine, who I learned was an avid fan of the band Avenged Sevenfold and was really upset that she couldn’t bring herself to listen to it here at college. She explained to me it was about self-discovery but she felt like she was losing a part of herself. That was the most engaging lunch discussion I’ve had in awhile.

conversation

So, to tally up the score, it looks like it is a fail-to-win ratio of  2:5 

I call that a pretty good day.

This is Ryan, signing off.

C9CNKsq

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s